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A lot of shaking going on ... A series of small earthquakes caused minor damage in southern Colorado -- and raised some serious questions about possible causes, including industry activity.

Security in Canada ... moves quickly to ensure pipeline security.

AAPG member Sam Epstein has his own story to tell about what it was like at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. He was there.

The weather: Will natural gas prices suffer this winter from an El NiƱo weather event?


Hydril Project: A new technology called dual gradient drilling has the potential to revolutionize deep-water drilling.

Intimidated at the wellsite? Geologists who keep up to speed on developments involving drilling fluids and new techniques can be enormously valuable.

Magnetic resonance imaging can provide answers to many questions regarding downhole geology.

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) continues to be a valuable and technically evolving tool for downhole geology.

Economics and risk: Borehole imaging using microresistivity images have become important, efficient, cost-effective tools

 

Unraveling the secrets of the subsurface is always a tricky proposition, but today's geologists are reaping the benefits of technological advances to help in their mission -- developments that are covered in several stories in this annual Downhole Geology issue of the EXPLORER. The cover design, created by Rusty Johnson, features a drillsite photo, courtesy of Evergreen Resources, and a structural cross section based on dips from well bore and an interpreted structural model, courtesy of Schlumberger.


STANDING ARTICLES:

PRESIDENT'S COLUMN:
Asia Pacific --- An AAPG Growth Area

BUSINESS SIDE OF GEOLOGY:
The Money Taboo

GEOPHYSICAL CORNER:
Seismic Maps Ferron Coalbed Sweetspots

INTERNATIONAL BULLETIN BOARD


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